Why Corporate IT should be as simple to set up and use as consumer IT

I’m not afraid of dreaming big. Let me tell you more.

I’m a taxpayer living in the US. I need to file tax returns before April 15 of every year to the federal and state governments. People used to do it with paper and pen. You can still do it that old way but nowadays most people do it on computer. I go to a store and buy a notebook or desktop computer. I buy tax return preparation software (let’s call the software a “pattern”). I bring the hardware and the “pattern” home. I power on the computer, install the pattern and I’m ready to do my taxes. It takes probably a couple hours and I’m in business. Let’s call it “consumer IT.”  While working on my tax return, I’m thinking I probably should back up my data in case my notebook crashes. So I go buy a 1 TB USB hard drive for maybe US $100 or I might rent storage space from the “cloud” on the Internet. You see, consumer IT is simple and affordable to users. I’m sure you can come up with many consumer IT examples of your own.

Let’s compare it with corporate IT. Say your company needs computing environments to develop some web applications. Your IT departments buy various hardware and software components, connect them, and make sure they all work together. It’s not uncommon to take months before developers and users can actually work and use the environments.

So here is my dream: Corporate IT should be as simple, easy, and quick to set up and use as consumer IT, someday. IBM PureSystems is a game-changing next generation computing platform in that direction. They are “expert integrated systems.” You can start using the system within four hours with many software patterns to choose from, versus an average of four months if you integrate servers, network, storage and software stack yourself. So do you want to be entangled like this?

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Or do you want systems like this, ready to run your workloads in as little as four hours?

Don’t be fooled by the simplicity. IBM engineers have to do the heavy lifting under the covers so there’s less complexity that you have to deal with. I assembled radios from transistors, capacitors, resistors and other components as a kid. But that was a hobby. Fast forward to today, as a user, I need the GPS on my smartphone to provide a “service” that is to guide me to places I want to drive to but I don’t need nor want to know how all the pieces work together under the covers. That’s “Service Orientation.” Now your company can focus on innovation by using “service” rendered by PureSystems. You can focus on your core business competency like finding the next cancer fighting drug or improving guest experience at your hotels. I’m sure you agree with me the world will be a better place with PureSystems.

Editor’s Note:

Learn more about PureSystems at these events:

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PureSystems Analyst Paper - IDCInnovative companies continue to look for ways to deliver business value by accelerating time to market, improving application performance, and reducing the staff time needed for many routine ongoing management and support activities. Learn how you can do that and more in this Integrated Systems Analyst Paper from the IDC.

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Victor Xue

About Victor Xue

Victor Xue is an IBM certified IT Architect. He joined IBM in 2003 as a software project lead. He later served as a systems engineer/IT architect in IBM Global Business Services, Systems Engineering, Architecture and Test group. Currently, he is serving as infrastructure architect in IBM Global Technology Services, Strategic Outsourcing Delivery organization, providing technical solutions and services using x86, IBM Power Systems, VMware, etc. He has supported large and complex engagements for fortune 500 customers in various industries over the years. Follow Victor on Twitter @at0
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